Climate breaks multiple records in 2016, with global impacts

By World Meteorological Organization

The year 2016 made history, with a record global temperature, exceptionally low sea ice, and unabated sea level rise and ocean heat, according to the World Meteorological Organization (WMO). Extreme weather and climate conditions have continued into 2017.

WMO issued its annual statement on the State of the Global Climate ahead of World Meteorological Day on 23 March. It is based on multiple international datasets maintained independently by global climate analysis centres and information submitted by dozens of WMO Members, National Meteorological and Hydrological Services and Research Institutes and is an authoritative source of reference. Because the social and economic impacts of climate change have become so important, WMO partnered with other United Nations organizations for the first time this year to include information on these impacts.

“This report confirms that the year 2016 was the warmest on record – a remarkable 1.1 °C above the pre-industrial period, which is 0.06 °C above the previous record set in 2015. This increase in global temperature is consistent with other changes occurring in the climate system,” said WMO Secretary-General Petteri Taalas. >>

PRIMO recognises that trends in climate change have been described and analysed for years now. This report is in line with that. It is more and more becoming crystal clear that we will have to face huge public risks for citizen, society and nature as well as that political, governmental and entrepreneurial action is highly needed to reduce carbon dioxide emission. What is relevant to quote is that Secretary General Petteri Taalas brings forward his strong belief that we are in unknown territory now, an area were the governance and management of ‘risk and resilience’ should be at his best. Considering the complexity and the multitude of stakes and interests this will though be highly challenging.