Risk Management and CAF/TQM

EIPA logoPRIMO and EIPA combined forces in order to align the risk management and the quality management dynamic. Knowledge and networks of both organisations will be combined to realise the goal of having a platform through which civil servants and (local) politicians can learn about good governance. In the seminar of EIPA, PRIMO will focus not only on the technical and managerial part of risk management but also highlight the context of the present public domain and the need for an holistic approach of public risks. The results of the Global Risks Report by the World Economic Forum will be discussed during the seminar.

Target group

This seminar is designed for top and middle managers, quality and change managers, and experts in charge of strategy development in the public sector (ministries, agencies, regional and local administrations, education, police, healthcare, etc.), who have a special interest in two important items of good governance: risk management and TQM.

Description

The Common Assessment Framework (CAF) is based on the premise that excellent results in organisational performance, citizens/customers, people and society are achieved through leadership to drive strategy and planning, people, partnerships, resources and processes. Nowadays much attention is focused on the functioning of good governance. Due to the worldwide financial and economic situation, every government organisation must deal with reduced budgets. It is a challenge to reach goals and to improve performance, whilst budgets are simultaneously being cut drastically; all kind of risks can occur. Key items in good governance are risk management and internal control. What are the risks and how can we reduce them? Internal control is an important control measure that can reduce risks. Are the working processes at a level at which they can be trusted from a good governance perspective? In this seminar participants will discuss these issues with each other and with the speakers, as well as working on concrete examples of quality management and good governance.

Learning methodology

A mixture of presentations, experiences and interactive discussions in a combination of workshops and plenary sessions.

Objectives

By the end of the seminar the participants should have a clear understanding of:

    • the CAF 2013 quality model itself, the implementation process and the impact on the organisation;
    • the process of developing a risk management strategy for their organisations;
    • the necessary working steps and examples;
    • material to be used.

Consequently, the participants will return to their administration with their own view of risk management and internal control, based on the knowledge they will gain over the three days. This training is organised with the support of the European Public Risk Management Organisation (PRIMO). Read more >

CAF and context

The Common Assessment Framework (CAF) is based on the premise that excellent results in organisational performance, citizens/customers, people and society are achieved through leadership to drive strategy and planning, people, partnerships, resources and processes.

Nowadays much attention is focused on the functioning of good governance. Due to the worldwide financial and economic situation, every government organisation must deal with reduced budgets. It is a challenge to reach goals and to improve performance, whilst budgets are simultaneously being cut drastically; all kind of risks can occur.

Key items in good governance are risk management and internal control. What are the risks and how can we reduce them? Internal control is an important control measure that can reduce risks. Are the working processes at a level at which they can be trusted from a good governance perspective?

A well thought out and comprehensive risk management programme should be used by organisations within the public sector to align their strategic and operational goals to government policy and initiatives so as to achieve the greatest level of operational efficiency and effectiveness. Risk management should underlie resource management and any budgetary control agenda so as to encourage an inherent risk management mindset in all decisions. A successful risk management programme must be all-encompassing, robust and most of all an integral part of the organisation’s culture.

Shrinking budgets and reduced staff numbers, new regulations and increased demands for services are forcing today’s risk executives to do more with less. In addition, climate change, advances in technology and population growth continue to put the existing infrastructure under strain and change both the levels and types of risk present.